Lately at makerspace

We’ve had a few recent “Arduinos for Absolute Beginners” classes on, two at the makerspace and one at Hive – all have been successful and a lot of fun! I’ve found it particularly interesting to observe the different programming approaches taken by older vs younger students, and how well the different notification methods influenced people to bring USB cables and computers to the class :).

Last Saturday, we adapted and installed a fixture from the old location at King Edward Court in the Valley Workspace – the bare copper wires for hanging LEDs! (Photo coming soon).

Next up is Learn To Solder night, tomorrow 18 May 7:30pm at the Dunedin Makerspace. Bring yourself (in warm clothes), and a gold coin koha or better your membership!

As usual, if you miss one of our events, either post on the mailing list or come to the next open workshop and we can often get you caught up.

Using the inductor tester

inductor tester
The inductor tester, and inductors used for examples below

A few weeks back, we had a talk on KiCad (presentation available at http://ianrrees.github.io/KiCad_talk/ ) where we ordered some PCBs to make an inductor tester (Henryometer?) from dirty PCBs. Those boards came in this week, and a few folks have already put theirs together. This post aims to be a quick guide to the usage of the tester; if you’d like to build one yourself just let Ian know, parts cost is $15. You’ll need an oscilloscope and a current-limited DC power supply to make use of it.

Continue reading “Using the inductor tester”

What’s been happening at the makerspace?

After a hiatus over the Christmas/New Years break and a slow start to the year, the Makerspace has been bustling with activity recently. Brian Paavo talked about the underwater scanner project the Makerspace is collectively working on, and work has been progressing on that (there will be a post about that soon). Paul Campbell held a soldering workshop, and about a dozen people made LED sculptures. One of the highlights on Saturday was William George’s project of converting  chrome-plated toaster into an audio CD player. And when you come into the Makerspace now, you’ll notice that the room has been re-organised to be better, easier to working in, and more inviting (with special thanks to Chris Baxter and Brian Paavo).

Photos from the soldering workshop:

Paul shows a simple LED circuit diagram
Chris and Paul burn out an LED on purpose
James gets started on soldering
We have an extensive collection of resistors

Working on the underwater scanner project:

Micheal discovers a possible issue on the main circuit board design

William’s converted toaster:

The shiniest CD player ever
This toaster is powered by an Arduino

Talk: Beginning electronics courses

I’ve started giving a series of basic electronics courses at Makerspace – these are aimed at everyone including complete beginners – I’m avoiding maths as much as possible, the idea is to get an understanding of what’s going on in a circuit without getting bogged down in the details – your goal should be to be able to look at a schematic, ask yourself  “what’s that thing for?” and be able to make a reasonable guess

I’m making heavy use of the excellent circuit simulations at http://www.falstad.com/circuit/e-index.html – your browser will need java enabled to use them.

The first session was very basic – the slides are in the PDF file below
– if you couldn’t make it you should be able to follow through the talk – the main goal here is to end up playing with the circuit simulation examples – poke at things, change the values of voltages, resistors, capacitors to see what happens (just click on them)

http://www.taniwha.com/~paul/electronics1.pdf